Ammonite Poster: Spira Mirabilis

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Ammonite Poster: Spira Mirabilis, carbon dust on paper, Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator

One of the first projects we did in class this year was to draw a crystalized fossil using carbon dust. For my poster from that project, I incorporated my enjoyment of math along with my ammonite drawing to explore how its spiral related to the rest of the universe, both large and small.

 

Squid Poster

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Squid Poster, watercolor, Adobe Illustrator

I repainted my squid for my final poster for my natural science illustration class and created this poster about the squid’s ability to change color.

My teacher suggested I put one of its tentacles into an extreme perspective, just for fun, so you can see one of the tentacles reaching out towards you — either you’re about to get “suction cupped” — or maybe it’s a friendly squid and you’ll just get high-fived!?

Also, she helped me understand watercolor glazing, so I added a light glazing of watercolor the squid’s mantle, especially, to reflect some of its opalescence and to get more of a sense of the rounded shape. So over it’s sepia base I added blues, purples, corals and pinks (cool and warm colors).

I added the film strip to give you a sense of how quickly and completely a squid can change colors. I put it onto the poster in a way that made it look like it was taped on in front of it, with a drop shadow and apparently hanging over the edge of the poster.

Here’s the new watercolor just by itself:

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Grasshopper Poster

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The Grasshopper’s Leap, colored pencil on Dura-Lar film, Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Animate

This is the poster I made for my class project from my previous grasshopper drawings. I wanted to focus on how the grasshopper jumps, because they have a secret: they have a spring in their legs! They can jump 20 times their length, which for a person would mean being able to jump the length of a basketball court. They also, at liftoff, feel a force of 20-times the force of gravity (20-g’s). For reference, the space shuttle lifts off at 3 g’s.

Their muscles alone are not capable of generating this force; this poster explains how a bendy cuticle in their leg makes their leap possible.

I also wanted to do something fun with the poster and make the poster come alive by connecting it to the web in some way, so I added a QR code that, when you scan it, takes you to an animation I made in Flash (via Adobe Animate) of the grasshopper leaping. (I also animated the inclusion/close-up.)

 

Seashell in Graphite and Carbon Dust

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Seashell 1, Graphite on Bristol

I started my classes for the Certificate program in Natural Science Illustration at the University of Washington, and this is one of the first assignments — to draw a shell in graphite and also in carbon dust.

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Seashell 2, Carbon dust on Bristol

I’m still getting the hang of carbon dust. The technique is cool, because you paint the dust onto the paper with a brush! I’m going to do more drawings to practice getting a smoother look.